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Organizaciones de la Sociedad Civil: actores clave para la integridad de las políticas públicas

Mariana Gutiérrez Grados vive en Ciudad de México y es un miembro de WIN. Trabaja por el portal www.agua.org.mx donde está encargada de facilitar al usuario de internet la información por cuenca a nivel nacional con el fin de concientizar a los ciudadanos en el uso racional del agua. Desde Abril hasta Julio de 2013 estudió en el curso organizado por WIN y la Escuela Virtual del PNUD

El principio de integridad hace referencia a la inclusión social y es la base para la consecución de los otros tres principios que sustentan el derecho humano al agua y la lucha a la corrupción: transparencia, rendición de cuentas y participación. Las Organizaciones de la Sociedad Civil (OSC) al hacer efectivos los mecanismos de participación ciudadana, las posiciona como aliadas claves en la formulación, implementación y evaluación de las políticas públicas. A continuación expongo los motivos para resaltar el impacto de las OSC en dicho ciclo:

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Observatorio “El agua en mi ciudad” como herramienta de integridad en México

Mariana Gutiérrez Grados vive en Ciudad de México y es un miembro de WIN. Trabaja por el portal www.agua.org.mx donde está encargada de facilitar al usuario de internet la información por cuenca a nivel nacional con el fin de concientizar a los ciudadanos en el uso racional del agua. Desde Abril hasta Julio de 2013 estudió en el curso organizado por WIN y la Escuela Virtual del PNUD

Mi motivación como agente de cambio en mi país, se dirige a retomar a la sociedad civil organizada como aliado en la formulación de las políticas públicas que impactan en la gestión del agua. Un claro ejemplo es el proyecto que estoy diseñando como parte del Fondo para la Comunicación y la Educación Ambiental A.C (FCEA), una organización de la sociedad civil sin fines de lucro. Uno de los proyectos del FCEA es el Portal Agua (www.agua.org.mx) que desde el 2004, da espacio virtual a las personas preocupadas y activas por el agua en México.

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From Transparency International: Marching against corruption in the water sector in Brazil – final days

Marching against corruption in the water sector in Brazil – final daysThis is re-posted from Transparency International’s blog. We’ll be following and re-posting their series on the anti-corruption march currently taking place in Brazil.

This post is authored by Lirian Pádua, a Journalism graduate who works as a reporter, editor, and photographer and is volunteering for the NGO Batra (Bauru Transparente), a member of Amarribo Brasil’s network.

 

The 12th March against corruption that wound its way through the arid countryside of Piauí came to end last week. Along the way in Jurema, Anísio de Abreu, São Braz and São Raimundo Nonato we checked up on public works and talked to people about how they can demand their rights from local government. In addition to this we also visited smaller communities where we saw the terrible problems people have to survive because of the lack of water, basic sanitation and poor public services.

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From Transparency International: Marching against corruption in the water sector in Brazil – day three

Marching against corruption in the water sector in Brazil – Day threeThis is re-posted from Transparency International’s blog. We’ll be following and re-posting their series on the anti-corruption march currently taking place in Brazil.

This post is authored by Lirian Pádua, a Journalism graduate who works as a reporter, editor, and photographer and is volunteering for the NGO Batra (Bauru Transparente), a member of Amarribo Brasil’s network.

Between the towns of Caracol and Jurema, in the small neighbourhood of Pitombeiras we saw just what a difference water can make and the damaging effects of what we call the drought industry. This was day three of our march against corruption in the dry, heartland of Brazil’s north eastern state of Piaui.

Thiago says he doesn’t lack water on his property

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From Transparency International: Marching against corruption in the water sector in Brazil – day two

Marching against corruption in the water sector in Brazil – Day twoThis is re-posted from Transparency International’s blog. We’ll be following and re-posting their series on the anti-corruption march currently taking place in Brazil. 

“This post is authored by Lirian Pádua, a Journalism graduate who works as a reporter, editor, and photographer and is volunteering for the NGO Batra (Bauru Transparente), a member of Amarribo Brasil’s network.

Marchers led into Cajueiro.

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Formation de renforcement des capacités des acteurs du Burkina Faso, Mali, Niger sur l’Intégrité de l’Eau.

Ce blog a été écrit par Francoise Nicole Ndoume, Coordinatrice de Programme au Réseau d’intégrité de l’eau. Elle s’occupe particulièrement des programmes en Afrique francophones et des programmes de dévelopement de capacités.

Du 24 au 28 juin 2013, le Réseau de l’Intégrité de l’Eau (WIN), le Centre de Coordination des Ressources en Eau de la CEDEAO (CCRE), le Global Water Partnership  Afrique de l’Ouest (GWP/AO)  et l’Union pour la Conservation de la Nature (IUCN) ont réuni à Ouagadougou une trentaine de participants  venus du Niger, Mali et Burkina Faso  et issus des secteurs privé et public, de la société civile, des medias ainsi que les représentants de l’Autorité du Bassin du Niger et de la Coordination Régionale des usagers du Bassin du Niger. Durant 5 jours, les participants se sont penchés sur les questions liées à  la gouvernance de l’eau en l’occurrence la corruption dans le secteur de l’eau, l’identification des risques de corruption, sur la question des lois et des institutions de lutte contre la corruption, sur la transparence et l’accès à l’information, la redevabilité, et l’intégrité dans la gestion intégrée des ressources en eau.

Renforcement des capacités des acteurs du Burkina Faso, Mali, Niger sur l’Intégrité de l’Eau

Renforcement des capacités des acteurs du Burkina Faso, Mali, Niger sur l’Intégrité de l’Eau

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Integrity, the private water utilities and why it matters

This blog entry was written by Janek Hermann-Friede, Monitoring, Programme Planning, Focal Point East Africa Coordinator at WIN. 

At Savern Trent Water a corruption case emerged as a result of whistle-blowing in 2004. We are talking about the second-largest water company in Great Britain. Following the scandal a change in management resulted in far reaching reforms to enhance integrity of the company, tackling processes, behaviours and values simultaneously. Prosecution resulted in a fine for Savern Trent in 2008. Just a year later, the company was awarded ‘Utility of the Year’ in recognition of their reform efforts (for more information on this case see Dietz, G. and Gillespie, N. 2012). This clearly shows one of the main benefits that a company can gain from enhanced corporate integrity – a good reputation. However there are several other ways how integrity pays off.

Planta de Caraz, Peru. Copyright Janek Hermann-Friede

Planta de Caraz, Peru. Copyright Janek Hermann-Friede

But let’s first take a step back and look at the role of the private sector in water supply and wastewater management. In the 1990s donors and multinational companies increasingly pushed towards privatisation of service provision. Various failed concessions led to public opposition and an ideologically driven debate. More recently there has been a trend to commercialise the operations of water providers in a socially acceptable way. This means that service providers are operated and managed like private entities but consider marginalised groups and the poor adequately when it comes to tariff setting, investment decisions, customer management etc. In consequence, some of the public attention shifted from the providers to companies that consume large amounts of water. A recent European Citizens’ Initiative opposing the European Commission’s proposal for a Directive on the award of concession contracts for water supply and wastewater services shows however that private sector engagement remains a relevant and sensitive topic.

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Repost: Dirty money for clean water?

Please note that this blog entry was originally posted on the Agriculture and Ecosystems blog. It was written by Fred Pearce, who is a journalist and author based in London, UK.  He writes regularly for New Scientist magazine, the Guardian newspaper and Yale e360 web site.  His books include Peoplequake, When the Rivers Run Dry and, mostly recently, The Land Grabbers.

For updates follow us on @WLE_CGIAR and on Facebook.

If the UN high-level panel on sustainable development goals gets its way, the world will from 2015 be chasing a target to “reduce bribery and corruption”. That was the recommendation set out in the panel’sreport last month – and, right on cue, water professionals last week held the Water Integrity Forum in the Dutch town of Delft to discuss how to improve integrity in an industry that, it acknowledged in its final statement, “is particularly vulnerable to corruption”.

Water point in Turba. Photo Credit: UNAMID on Flickr

The proposed UN target has a long way to go before it is adopted by the General Assembly in September.  Not least answering the question of how you measure bribery and corruption.  The danger will be that some convenient abstraction gets adopted, such as the millennium development goals’ health target for delivering safe drinking water, which became an engineering target for “improved” water supplies.

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The first Water Integrity Forum comes to a successful conclusion

On June 5th to June 7th, the UNESCO-IHE hosted the first ever Water Integrity Forum which was organised by the Water Integrity Network (WIN) and the UNESCO-IHE. The first Water Integrity Forum came to a successful conclusion with the Ugandan Minister of State for Water Resources,  Ms Betty Bigombe announcing that she, along with Ms Kitty van der Heijden, Director of the Department for Climate, Environment, Energy and Water and the Ambassador for Sustainable Development, Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs  will jointly take the lead in putting water integrity in the global development agenda, especially in ongoing processes like the Post-2015 Development Agenda. Before making this declaration, Betty Bigombe and Kitty van der Heijden made an impromptu consultation during the closing session of the Forum.

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High-level panel at the closing session of the Water Integrity Forum

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Interview with keynote speakers at the Water Integrity Forum

Daniel Valensuela – OIEau. Daniel Valensuela is a co-convener in one of the Work Streams at the Water Integrity Forum. He has worked with the GWP Secretariat for six years, where he focused on IWRM and partnerships in countries (mainly Africa), and then joined INBO and IOWater, working on institutional reform, IWRM at basin scale, water governance at national, basin and transboundary levels. Here he shares his expectations on the first Water Integrity Forum and his thoughts on water integrity in general.

Written by Moisés de la Cerda, WIN intern for online communication, specifically for the Water Integrity Forum.

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